OTTAWA – November 29, 2021 – Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada has launched Let’s Talk about Ujarak: A Cannabis Harm Reduction Toolkit as part of the Cannabis in Our Communities: A Focus on Inuit Youth and Maternal Health and Well-Being project. This project aims to help Inuit youth, expecting parents, and families to better understand the facts and myths about cannabis and how to reduce possible harms to promote healthy families and communities. 

Let’s Talk about Ujarak: A Cannabis Harm Reduction Toolkit provides Inuit-specific, evidence-based, and relatable information to Inuit who are interested in trying cannabis, or who already use cannabis, to do so in a way that reduces risks and potential harms. 

“During engagement, community members shared their belief that cannabis use is common and normalized in our communities. So, Let’s Talk about Ujarak: A Cannabis Harm Reduction Toolkit addresses the need for accurate and trustworthy information to help Inuit make informed choices,” said Pauktuutit President Rebecca Kudloo. “By providing culturally relevant materials that increase awareness, reduce stigma, and reduce harm, we hope to open up conversations about cannabis and help minimize risks among Inuit youth and families.”

Featuring artwork by artist Charlotte Karetak, the toolkit’s key theme is “There’s More to This Than Cannabis.” Cannabis use among Inuit is complex. To help make the topic more accessible, Pauktuutit’s toolkit includes fact sheets, a discussion guide, posters, branded clothing, promotional items, and a tool for self-reflection on cannabis use habits to share information in an engaging way.

Let’s Talk about Ujarak: A Cannabis Harm Reduction Toolkit can be found on the Cannabis in Our Communities project page or at letstalkaboutujarak.com

To schedule an interview:

Please contact Amanda Deseure, 613.806.3336 or email [email protected].

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Pauktuutit is the national non-profit organization representing all Inuit women in Canada. 

Its mission is to foster a greater awareness of the needs of Inuit women and to encourage their participation in community, regional, and national concerns in relation to social, cultural, and economic development.